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How to benefit from Tilapia farming

Over the years, Tilapia has risen to the top as a seafood staple on American dinner tables. This is according to information from the National Fisheries Institute.

By 2014, Tilapia had climbed to become the fourth most eaten seafood in the U.S., behind only shrimp, salmon and canned tuna.

It is believed that Tilapia’s popularity comes from the fact that it’s easy to farm, so it’s inexpensive and it goes down easy.

That is why at Mask Agro, we decided to engage in Tilapia farming. We also encourage more people to visit our farms and learn how to engage in its farming.

Tilapia is a very hearty variety that is adaptable to different types of feed and tastes pretty good too.

It is cheap, easy to find and its fish so it’s good for you.

To date, it is the most sought after type of fish in Uganda. A visit to several landing sites will confirm this. However, being the most delicious and sought after fish in the country makes it hard to find.

Government recently stopped fishermen from selling immature fish, and this is what most Ugandans consumed in the past, immature Tilapia from Lake Victoria, but with the government’s directive, a few mature Tilapia is on market.

This is where Mask Agro comes in handy. With the capacity to produce at least 30,000 fingerlings the company hopes to help fish farmers in the country to grow more Tilapia and enjoy better sales.

In our hatchery, the fingerlings are well fed on high proteins, given access to enough oxygen and temperatures of between 25 to 28 degrees C.

When a farmer picks our fingerlings and takes to a pond, we expect them to follow the same procedure to ensure that they harvest mature Tilapia in a space of 6-8 months.

A single female Tilapia of 200 grams produces between 500-1500 eggs in one lay. After the 24 hours of hatching, we remove them and start breeding them. We also ensure that their sex is reversed so that we sell only male fish to our farmers.

This is to ensure that the fish does not multiply while in the pond. Several fish farmers have been wondering why it takes them a year to harvest, and the fish turn up stunted. Well, this is because they buy fish of mixed sex, which encourages production of more fingerlings while in the pond. This means that they have to compete for the feeds, oxygen and temperatures that were meant for a given amount of fingerlings one had bought originally.   

We therefore reverse sex of our fish to male, so as to help a farmer budget for whatever he puts in the pond accordingly.

To date, Tilapia, the once obscure African native is the most popular farmed fish in the United States. However, Uganda having several lakes including L. Victoria has left many people lazy to engage in fish farming.

 

Many a people believe, that fish can only come from the lake, and that fish farming is expensive, that is why Mask takes time to train our farmers and help them in case they run into any issues, so as to produce more fish for Uganda and the broad East African region.

Our first production of fingerlings, at least 300 in number are growing. We urge any farmers that have ponds or want to start breeding, to come to our farm and receive knowledge from experts on how to breed fish.

 

Today, China and the U.S. seem to be producing more Tilapia than Africa, where the breed originated from. We believe the condition can be reversed if there are more farmers willing to engage in Tilapia (fish) farming.

Over the years, Tilapia has risen to the top as a seafood staple on American dinner tables. This is according to information from the National Fisheries Institute.

By 2014, Tilapia had climbed to become the fourth most eaten seafood in the U.S., behind only shrimp, salmon and canned tuna.

It is believed that Tilapia’s popularity comes from the fact that it’s easy to farm, so it’s inexpensive and it goes down easy.

That is why at Mask Agro, we decided to engage in Tilapia farming. We also encourage more people to visit our farms and learn how to engage in its farming.

Tilapia is a very hearty variety that is adaptable to different types of feed and tastes pretty good too.

It is cheap, easy to find and its fish so it’s good for you.

To date, it is the most sought after type of fish in Uganda. A visit to several landing sites will confirm this. However, being the most delicious and sought after fish in the country makes it hard to find.

Government recently stopped fishermen from selling immature fish, and this is what most Ugandans consumed in the past, immature Tilapia from Lake Victoria, but with the government’s directive, a few mature Tilapia is on market.

This is where Mask Agro comes in handy. With the capacity to produce at least 30,000 fingerlings the company hopes to help fish farmers in the country to grow more Tilapia and enjoy better sales.

In our hatchery, the fingerlings are well fed on high proteins, given access to enough oxygen and temperatures of between 25 to 28 degrees C.

When a farmer picks our fingerlings and takes to a pond, we expect them to follow the same procedure to ensure that they harvest mature Tilapia in a space of 6-8 months.

A single female Tilapia of 200 grams produces between 500-1500 eggs in one lay. After the 24 hours of hatching, we remove them and start breeding them. We also ensure that their sex is reversed so that we sell only male fish to our farmers.

This is to ensure that the fish does not multiply while in the pond. Several fish farmers have been wondering why it takes them a year to harvest, and the fish turn up stunted. Well, this is because they buy fish of mixed sex, which encourages production of more fingerlings while in the pond. This means that they have to compete for the feeds, oxygen and temperatures that were meant for a given amount of fingerlings one had bought originally.   

We therefore reverse sex of our fish to male, so as to help a farmer budget for whatever he puts in the pond accordingly.

To date, Tilapia, the once obscure African native is the most popular farmed fish in the United States. However, Uganda having several lakes including L. Victoria has left many people lazy to engage in fish farming.

 

Many a people believe, that fish can only come from the lake, and that fish farming is expensive, that is why Mask takes time to train our farmers and help them in case they run into any issues, so as to produce more fish for Uganda and the broad East African region.

Our first production of fingerlings, at least 300 in number are growing. We urge any farmers that have ponds or want to start breeding, to come to our farm and receive knowledge from experts on how to breed fish.

 

Today, China and the U.S. seem to be producing more Tilapia than Africa, where the breed originated from. We believe the condition can be reversed if there are more farmers willing to engage in Tilapia (fish) farming.

Over the years, Tilapia has risen to the top as a seafood staple on American dinner tables. This is according to information from the National Fisheries Institute.

By 2014, Tilapia had climbed to become the fourth most eaten seafood in the U.S., behind only shrimp, salmon and canned tuna.

It is believed that Tilapia’s popularity comes from the fact that it’s easy to farm, so it’s inexpensive and it goes down easy.

That is why at Mask Agro, we decided to engage in Tilapia farming. We also encourage more people to visit our farms and learn how to engage in its farming.

Tilapia is a very hearty variety that is adaptable to different types of feed and tastes pretty good too.

It is cheap, easy to find and its fish so it’s good for you.

To date, it is the most sought after type of fish in Uganda. A visit to several landing sites will confirm this. However, being the most delicious and sought after fish in the country makes it hard to find.

Government recently stopped fishermen from selling immature fish, and this is what most Ugandans consumed in the past, immature Tilapia from Lake Victoria, but with the government’s directive, a few mature Tilapia is on market.

This is where Mask Agro comes in handy. With the capacity to produce at least 30,000 fingerlings the company hopes to help fish farmers in the country to grow more Tilapia and enjoy better sales.

In our hatchery, the fingerlings are well fed on high proteins, given access to enough oxygen and temperatures of between 25 to 28 degrees C.

When a farmer picks our fingerlings and takes to a pond, we expect them to follow the same procedure to ensure that they harvest mature Tilapia in a space of 6-8 months.

A single female Tilapia of 200 grams produces between 500-1500 eggs in one lay. After the 24 hours of hatching, we remove them and start breeding them. We also ensure that their sex is reversed so that we sell only male fish to our farmers.

This is to ensure that the fish does not multiply while in the pond. Several fish farmers have been wondering why it takes them a year to harvest, and the fish turn up stunted. Well, this is because they buy fish of mixed sex, which encourages production of more fingerlings while in the pond. This means that they have to compete for the feeds, oxygen and temperatures that were meant for a given amount of fingerlings one had bought originally.   

We therefore reverse sex of our fish to male, so as to help a farmer budget for whatever he puts in the pond accordingly.

To date, Tilapia, the once obscure African native is the most popular farmed fish in the United States. However, Uganda having several lakes including L. Victoria has left many people lazy to engage in fish farming.

 

Many a people believe, that fish can only come from the lake, and that fish farming is expensive, that is why Mask takes time to train our farmers and help them in case they run into any issues, so as to produce more fish for Uganda and the broad East African region.

Our first production of fingerlings, at least 300 in number are growing. We urge any farmers that have ponds or want to start breeding, to come to our farm and receive knowledge from experts on how to breed fish.

Today, China and the U.S. seem to be producing more Tilapia than Africa, where the breed originated from. We believe the condition can be reversed if there are more farmers willing to engage in Tilapia (fish) farming.

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